Female Newsmaker VoiceShare Among Top 15 Print Journalists

Chart shows VoiceShare of female newsmakers (percent of statements from females) in articles of the top fifteen print journalists (based on statement volume per journalist) with statements from candidates excluded from sample (red) and included (blue). Time Frame is Nov 1 – May 15.

Chart shows VoiceShare of female newsmakers (percent of statements from females) in articles of the top fifteen print journalists (based on statement volume per journalist) with statements from candidates excluded from sample (red) and included (blue). Time Frame is Nov 1 – May 15.

Statements from female newsmakers only make up 20% or more of statements in articles from four of the top ten journalists when candidate statements are excluded. Aaron Gould Sheinin of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Thomas Fitzgerald of the Philadelphia Inquirer, Mark Z. Barabak of the Los Angeles Times and Michael Levenson of the Boston Globe attributed at least 20% of their statements to females when candidate statements were excluded from the sample, and at least 11% when candidate statements were included.

When taking into account candidate statements, articles by Aaron Gould Sheinin display the highest percentage of statements from female newsmakers. 22% of the statements in his articles come from females when candidates are included, only 5% less than when they are excluded. This shows that statements from candidates did not make up a large portion of his coverage. On the other hand, articles from Associated Press/freelance journalist David Espo have only 4% of statements from female newsmakers when candidates are included, but when candidates are taken out of the picture, that number goes up to 19%. Espo, as a freelance journalist, has written mostly short, frequent articles that cover the candidates without delving much deeper into other types of newsmakers.