The top journalists who frame election topics in major newspapers have different coverage foci. While some have similar patterns, others seem to have their own agenda.

Chart shows percentage of statements about different topics among top 5 print journalists since May 1.  “Other” represents topics out of the top 5 for each journalist.  Top journalists determined by highest quantity of articles written about the election.  Time frame is May 1 – July 6.

Chart shows percentage of statements about different topics among top 5 print journalists since May 1. “Other” represents topics out of the top 5 for each journalist. Top journalists determined by highest quantity of articles written about the election. Time frame is May 1 – July 6.

In the past two months, these five journalists have been driving the print coverage of the presidential election. The non-policy related topics of Campaign Strategy (red) and Candidate Character (light blue), dominate the coverage in articles by Philip Rucker (Washington Post), Susan Page (USA Today) and Thomas Fitzgerald (Philadelphia Inquirer). The topic most equally covered by these top five journalists is the Economy (yellow).

Interestingly, Matt Viser of the Boston Globe devotes very little attention to Campaign Strategy and Candidate Character. Just 19% of the statements in his articles are about these two topics combined. Instead, Viser has had more focus on policy issues. In the past two months, Immigration (brown) and the Economy (yellow) have been the topics most discussed in statements in his articles on the election.

The two journalists from the Washington Post in this list are also the only two that have coverage of Healthcare (light purple), Karen Tumulty and Philip Rucker. Tumulty covered it the most with 21% of the statements in her articles being about that topic.

Also of note is that articles by Susan Page lack breadth in comparison to the other journalists in this list. She has a very strong focus on Campaign Strategy, Candidate Character and the Economy, but outside of these three issues she devotes very little coverage. Just 19% of the statements in her articles were about issues outside of those top three in the past two months. This contrasts with Viser’s articles on the election, in which 41% of the statements are about topics outside of his top three.